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High Gothic is a particularly refined and imposing style of Gothic architecture that appeared in northern France from about 1195 until 1250. Notable examples include Chartres Cathedral, Reims Cathedral, Amiens Cathedral, Beauvais Cathedral, and Bourges Cathedral. It is characterized by great height, harmony, subtle and refined tracery and realistic sculpture, and by large stained glass windows, particularly rose windows and larger windows on the upper levels, which filled the interiors with light. It followed Early Gothic architecture and was succeeded by the Rayonnant style. It is often described as the high point of the Gothic style.

1200-1350

High Gothic

Gothic painting developed from the 12th century to the 16th century. In its early and middle phase, it was entirely meaning painting, in which the focus was usually not on the naturalistic depiction of people or spatial perspective, but on the arrangement, proportioning and colouring according to religious meaning ("meaning perspective"). Religious motifs clearly predominated (winged altars, devotional pictures, etc.), but secular motifs such as courtly life, hunting and festivities were also taken up.

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